Google+ Followers

Saturday, 27 September 2014

ALBUM REVIEW:SLASH WORLD ON FIRE.


Myles Kennedy is a lucky man,being able to jump between Alter Bridge and Slash with such ease and maintain critical acclaim,is the work of one talented boy.  Mr Hudson clearly knows he has a winning formula with the Washington native, now on their second outing, with the follow up to 2012's Apocalyptic Love.

Title track,World On Fire, kicks the album off with a merciless bolt of lightning, no frills here, just a balls out rocker.  The stop start of Shadow Life loses momentum a bit after the anarchic beginning but Automatic Overdrive quickly regains speed with it's punk-esque vibe.

Slash gets his A game out for the first time on Wicked Stone,a menacingly melodic gem, the highlight of the album so far.  The wonderfully melancholy Bent To Fly lets you draw breathe a little, but not for long, as Stone Blind with it's deceptively slow start quickly  detonates with explosive fury.  Beneath The Savage Sun bears all the hallmarks of  Black Sabbath, a riff laden epic with an air of doom throughout.
The wonderful guitar swagger of Withered Delilah showcases Kennedy's gold label vocal range, while Battleground, with more than a hint of Starlight about it, is a brilliant wave your cell phone moment.  Dirty Girl is as close to Aerosmith's Rag Doll as you could get, but doesn't quite deliver in the same fashion as Mr Tyler and Co.

The album gets a well needed kick up the ass with Avalon, a real roll the top down and cruise tune, and then goes up a gear with The Dissident.  Though probably more Alter Bridge than Slash, it's infectious chorus is irresistible, probably my favourite on the album.  The Unholy finishes things up on a dark but majestic note, it wouldn't be out of place on an early Soundgarden album, with it's moody grunge feel, but maintains it's rock roots with a trademark Slash solo.

So clocking in at 77 minutes and 17 songs long, there's a hell of a lot to get your ears around, and will takes a few spins to truly grow on you.  But without doubt, it's a worthy successor to Apocalyptic Love, and the majority of this album will work even better in a live setting.  Which is where Slash, Kennedy and The Conspirators truly set the world on fire.